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20130104
20130112
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
look at many of you here today, knowing many of you have a key role in energy policy today, and hopefully what might happen over the next year or two as we consider the truly game changing opportunity we have here in the united states as it relates to energy. before i proceed and share remarks with you, i would like to introduce our friends at the head table today. i would like to begin with a new great cheerleader of energy that has come to the united states senate from the state of north dakota. senator, would you stand, please? [laughter] [applause] i think i finally found someone who is a bigger cheerleader than i am. we look forward to working with you. she is truly an expert in the area of oil and natural gas. she has been the tax commissioner and the state attorney general. she knows the industry well. let me quickly go around and introduce others. walter, if you would please stand. walt is the general president of the iron workers union. let me introduce doug. he is the president of the united brotherhood of carpenters heard we work closely. we have 15 unions now. t
're experimenting, you also have energy projects. again, we have an article in the world in 2013 about the extraordinary reduction in cost of solar power, for example, something similar to solar panels. >> there is a china law which is china sort of overproduces to the point of bankruptcy. that is why the panel is so low. it's close. >> do you see technology transforming our energy situation? >> although it's controversial, the fact of the matter is we should give credit to the people who invented these new forms of oil and natural gas drilling generally known as fracking, hydraulic fracking and so forth. those are resources that help us find pore of this stuff. we can have a discussion about recommendation and so forth. it's very controversial. that has materially changed the economic structure of energy in america. if you take a look at conservation and renewables which i think is ultimately the right answer, what you see now is the automation and instrumentation of passive systems, it changes everything. it goes under the term of smart building. roughly 40% of the carbon emissions t
, quirky and fun. >> talking about new things, new ways that you're experimenting, you also have energy projects. again, we have an article in the world in 2013 about the extraordinary reduction in cost of solar power, for example, something similar to solar panels. >> there is a china law which is china sort of overproduces to the point of bankruptcy. that is why the panel is so low. it's close. >> do you see technology transforming our energy situation? >> although it's controversial, the fact of the matter is we should give credit to the people who invented the new forms of oil and natural gas drilling generally known as fracking, hydraulic fracking and so forth. those are resources that help us find pore of this stuff. we can have a discussion about recommendation and so forth. it's very controversial. that has materially changed the economic structure of energy in america. if you take a look at conservation and renewables which i think is ultimately the right answer, what you see now is the automation and instrumentation of passive systems, it changes everything. it goes under the
job investments. the tax credit you mentioned which supports clean energy jobs. if this had been allowed to expire as many as 37,000 clean energy jobs could have been lost. mortgage debt relief which protects home owners from paying taxes on forgiven deat and bonus depreciation. so going back to the first point this package of tax extenders was supported on a buy partisan basis. the president supported it but you would have to spend disbelief to accept the premise that republicans did not. >> is there a moment that the president sat down with senator hagel and offered him the job and had a hart to heart talk about what direction he would like to see the pentagon move in? >> the president did taufer senator the job over the weekend by phone. they have a long relationship that dates back to their service together nth senate. they travelled together abroad and senator hagel after he left the senate was co-chair of the president's intelligence advisory board. so they have had an ongoing conversation about this nation's national security needs and the president's policies in the last
on society including health care energy. tomorrow morning, president obama's announcement of his nominees to head the defense department and cia. we will hear from the former house intelligence committee ranking member. she will take your questions about the nomination of john brennan to head the central intelligence agency. we will look at the nomination of senator chuck hagel to be secretary of defense with the foreign policy reuter. -- which the foreign policy writer. john talks about relations between the united states and afghanistan. "washington journal" is live on c-span every day at 7:00 eastern. >> i think cyber security remains a top priority because of the national-security implications. we saw that congress failed to reach an agreement in 2012. they remain far apart. the industry is opposed to any server security standards. >> another big issue will be implementing the incentive options to create more spectrum. the fcc is in the midst of working on that. some of the hot-button issues are unlicensed spectrum that powers wi-fi. >> net neutrality could be a big issue. the d.c. ci
. there is great energy around women's leadership in this country right now. we turned out women voters in our largest ever expenditure program across the country. in turning out these voters we did not just to let historic people to congress, but we have helped president barack obama, who has been so good for women across the country. it is so clear that this election was about women. women candidates, women donors. we heard a lot about women's issues. some in a way that i would prefer not to hear about. we heard about women voters who made those decisions. there was a lot of talk about the new democratic coalition of young people, hispanics, and women. i think that that is a great coalition. women are not just a voting bloc or a subset of the population. they are 51% of the population. last time that i checked, that was the majority. this last election, 55% of the women voted for president obama. there was an 18. gender gap. for every unmarried woman who voted for mitt romney, two voted for obama. women are going to make the decisions for the elections to come. they will decide to hold the p
the dialogue to change that discussion. do you want your children dodging bullets? many people look at energy and the consumption of our metal resources. this is important. it is not binding. -- unending. host: joseph ramirez adds this to the conversation -- the white house said the president will meet with hamid karzai on friday. josh ragan is on the phone with us to give us more details about these nominations. let's begin with the nomination of chuck hagel, why? guest: president obama has long been a friend of chuck hagel and they knew each other since 2007 when they served on the foreign relations committee. they traveled to iraq together in 2008 when president obama was just a candidate they have a similar war of view and agree on a lot of these issues. chuck hagel has been serving as president obama's intel is advisory board co-chair, they get along and obama can put someone in the office that agrees with him. he has a great personal relationship with him. host: what about the confirmation process? what is it looking like right now? articles are saying that there are about 10 senators w
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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